Blurry Vision

blurry image of smiling woman sitting at table

There are many potential causes for blurry eyes. The answer to why you have blurry vision is best answered by your eye care professional, who can offer diagnosis and prompt treatment so that your vision does not get worse. Some conditions that cause blurry vision are easy to treat, but others require quick medical attention.

Common Causes of Blurry Vision

Astigmatism—Refractive errors and irregularities on the cornea can make objects appear blurry from any distance. Prescription glasses, contacts, or refractive surgery can correct this problem.

Myopia or nearsightedness—Objects that are farther away appear blurry due to refraction irregularities. It can also be accompanied by headaches and eye fatigue.

Hyperopia or farsightedness—You may have to strain to see closer objects clearly, while objects further away are clearly visible. Hyperopia can cause headaches, eye strain and blurry vision when reading.

Presbyopia—Age-related hardening of the eye’s lens; causes symptoms similar to hyperopia. It can be treated with multifocal glasses or eye surgeries.

Computer Vision Syndrome—Eye strain related to an ergonomic problems and excessive use of computer screens. Frequent re-focusing rest breaks, special glasses, and an ergonomic workstation set up can help.

Pregnancy—Hormonal changes can affect the shape of your cornea, but more serious conditions like gestational diabetes or high blood pressure could also cause blurry vision during pregnancy. Contact your doctor immediately if this occurs.

Dry Eyes—Without sufficient tear lubrication, the eyes can feel irritated and scratchy while vision becomes blurry; artificial tears help in many cases while medications and punctal plugs can help in more severe situations.

Vitreous Injuries and Aging—As you age, gel-like vitreous can liquefy, causing microscopic bits of tissue to float around, casting shadows or “eye floaters” over the retina. An injury might also cause blood to enter the vitreous, also leading to blurred vision.

Eye Injuries and Infections—If the eye becomes inflamed from injury or an infection like conjunctivitis, blurry vision may result.

Post-LASIK Blurriness—Blurry vision is normal for a few days after surgery, but if it does not steadily improve, contact your eye care professional

Serious Causes of Blurry Vision

Note: people with cardiovascular conditions and diabetes need to be especially vigilant when any vision problems arise, as these can signal serious systemic health problems as well.

  • Eye Occlusions
  • Retinal Detachment
  • Cataracts
  • Glaucoma
  • Diabetic Retinopathy
  • Macular Degeneration

Contact your eye care professional right away if you experience blurry vision symptoms.

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